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Tips, Inspiration, & Resources

Inquire about my free consultation with feedback on your pages.

Photo by David Iskander on Unsplash.

Not sure what/whom exactly you're looking for?

Ask for my free phone consultation (audio or video), including feedback on your sample pages.

 

It's a great opportunity to get to know an editor while gaining awareness of how to capitalize on your strengths and address your challenges. Read More 

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Movies to Inspire Authors

"I wish I had started writing sooner."

"It's too late for me to be a writer."

"I don't have what it takes to write this story."

"I don't know if anyone cares what I have to say."
"I have no idea where to start."

"I wasted so much time."

"I wasted so many opportunities."

"I'm not good enough."

 

If any of this sounds familiar, then you need a big dose of encouragement, inspiration, and faith. Something that will motivate you to carve out a tiny bit of your day, your week, your month, for realizing your dreams. 

In short, you need to watch these movies.

 

And don't feel guilty--they're good for you. Check them out for a life-affirming shot of energy that will make you believe you can do it! Read More 

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What Publishers Look For On Your First Page, and other submission tips.

Querying can be a lonely, scary business. You send out these pages you've been laboring over for months, years, and sometimes it feels like it's been dropped into a black hole. It feels like it's out of your control, and in many ways it is. However, there are some things you can do to give your submissions the chance they deserve. 

 

THE FIRST PAGE OF YOUR BOOK.

 

Why is your first page all-important? Because it's all about grabbing the reader's attention. Think about what you do when you're browsing for a book in a bricks-and-mortar bookstore or online. First, it's the title and cover art that attract you. Then, you read the cover blurb. If it's catchy and appealing enough, you'll open the book to read the first page. If the first page doesn't grab you, you might not be patient enough to read the second page. Then you're on to the next book. 

 

Multiply your short attention span by at least a factor of 10, and you can imagine how little time an agent or an agent's assistant has to read through dozens of queries in a single day. If the first part of the query, which should read pretty much like jacket copy, doesn't grab them, they may not even read the first line of your first page, let alone your entire first page. And if that first page isn't gripping, then it's on to the next query. 

 

So how do you make that page compelling?

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7 Myths About Novelists

[Image courtesy of The British Library, from The Novels of Captain Marryat, page 208]

Let's bust up the seven biggest myths about novelists. If you're a novelist, an aspiring novelist, a devourer of novels, or all of the above, may the following illuminate, encourage, and inspire you.

 

I spent much of my life buying into all those "Truths" about novelists. Some of them were assumptions I made over a lifetime of reading novels, and others I picked up from various books and blogs on writing.

 

When I started writing, I figured that if I didn't fit into one of those so-called Truths I'd read about, there had to be something wrong with me. It took me a long time to realize that it wasn't a question of right or wrong; rather it's that what works for another novelist might not work for me, and vice versa. Read More 

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Writing Your Author Bio Without Blushing

Photo by Abigail Keenan on Unsplash

Most of us have no problem telling others, in detail, about what our dearest friend has accomplished. We can easily help that friend write a resumé or a dating profile or even rattle off their perfections while introducing them at a gathering. When it comes to singing our own praises, however, we can get tongue-tied. It may embarrass us. It may confuse us. It may leave us with absolutely nothing to say.

 

And then there's that author bio we're supposed to write for our book proposal. And the shortened form of it that's supposed to go on our agent query letters. How do we break through the wall of resistance and write a bio that expresses who we are and why we are the right person to write this book, that shows we are a promotable, passionate author with something to say? Read More 

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How NOT to hate writing a book proposal

I know what you might be thinking. Give me one good reason why I shouldn't hate the idea of writing a book proposal. I'LL GIVE YOU THREE GOOD REASONS.

 

1.   A good proposal serves as a blueprint for a compelling and coherent book that is unique in the marketplace and serves the needs of your target readers. Isn't it better to have that blueprint before you start than risk the chance of having to tear down what you've built and start from scratch because you didn't research the market or refine your idea?

 

2.   The process of researching and writing your proposal can get you all fired up about how great your book is. If it's having  the opposite effect, then it can inspire you to re-think your concept and come up with an idea that really keeps you fired up for the long haul.

 

3.   It serves as the foundation from which you will eventually publicize your book when it gets published. By the time you've perfected your proposal, you've become such an expert on how this book touches a chord with the public that you are able to succinctly and brilliantly express your conviction to other people.

 

Many writers of nonfiction books who are experts in their fields are not necessarily experts in explaining why people should want to read their book. Often we are so close to the work that we can't express ourselves clearly in terms that the sales department of the publishing house can repeat to the bookstores.

 

But after having worked on a good book proposal, you the author will be an expert in explaining why the public should buy your book and what they will gain from it.

        

So, now you know why it's good for you. But let's say you still feel less than enthusiastic, or intimidated, or overwhelmed. I'm going to show you how to break through those blocks with a powerful exercise.

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The Seven Elements of a Compelling Story: A Checklist

THE SEVEN ELEMENTS OF A COMPELLING  STORY

 

1. WHAT DOES YOUR CHARACTER WANT? (a/k/a, THE GOAL)

 

Some examples of goals:

  • Love, appreciation
  • recognition
  • the need to be understood
  • defeat of an enemy
  • basic human survival
  • recovery from trauma
  • closure after tragedy
  • finding a reason to live
  • finding a purpose
  • making peace with the past
  • triumph over adversity of any kind.

 

2. WHAT'S STOPPING HIM/HER FROM GETTING IT? (a/k/a CONFLICT):

  • Conflict takes many forms: Oneself (we are our own worst enemy), other people, situations. 
  • Infuse conflict into every scene.

3. WHY SHOULD YOUR READERS CARE ABOUT YOUR CHARACTER'S STRUGGLE? (a/k/a SYMPATHY)

  • Reveal the truth about your hero, even if he doesn't know it himself.
  • Give your characters layers and dimension—even villains are human beings; even heroes have flaws. 
  • Go easy on the self-pity, even infuse humor if possible. 

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The cure for writer's block: Embracing the "I don't know"

Not knowing is supposed to be a bad thing. However, with storytelling, not knowing can be the best thing that ever happened to you.

 

Because if you surrender to the "I don't know," then anything can happen.

 

Suddenly, you're in a magical world of endless possibilities.

 

You are a kid in a playground. A park. A candy shop. A toy store. You're in a place where you can have anything you want, be anything you want, go anywhere you want, travel to any time you want. It's one big game of pretend. No limitations.

 

HOW DO YOU DO IT? HOW DO YOU GET PAST THAT BLOCKED, SCARY PLACE?

 

 

Rule number one: Don't freak out.

It'll just waste your time and make you feel worse. Know that whatever you are going through is temporary. Tell yourself that you WILL get yourself out of that blocked place. Tell yourself you have nothing to lose by trying the methods in this post. 

 

Rule number two: Step away from the vehicle.

Stop trying to turn over that engine in your head. It's flooded with too much analytical, know-it-all thinking. The know-it-all is not your friend. The know-it-all is not going to get that sentence, that page, that chapter written. Because you are going to step into the land of "I don't know." Willingly!

 

Rule number three: Decide that you are in the wonderful land of "I don't know," where magical answers appear without any effort.

If you're saying to yourself, "yeah, right," with a big dose of sarcasm, tell that naysayer voice inside to take a hike. Tell yourself that it costs you nothing to believe in the magic of "I don't know." Go ahead, just give it a try. Allow for the possibility. Suspend disbelief. You don't have to tell anyone. And what do you have to lose?

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Taking Your Book to the Next Level: What a Professional Editor Can Do For You (Part 1)

Photo by Fernanda Marin on Unsplash.

 

Unless you are extraordinarily blessed, you probably are stronger as a writer in some areas than in others. A professional editor should not only point out your strengths and challenges, but also should help you triumph over your challenges by showing you how to expand your own strengths and talents into areas of the book that need them.

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Do you really need an editor for your book?

Photo by Aung Soe Min on Unsplash.

The answer is this: It is entirely up to you.

 

If you've taken your book as far as you can take it—and either you're stuck, or you just need a fresh pair of eyes--then you might consider finding an editor.

 

Taking your book as far as you can take it means different things to different authors.

It could mean you've written a first chapter and an outline and you want feedback before you go any further. Or it can mean you've written several drafts of an entire book or proposal. Only you can say if you've taken it as far as you can go for now. 

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